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Our fighting sisters: Nation, memory and gender in Algeria, 1954–2012

Our fighting sisters: Nation, memory and gender in Algeria, 1954–2012 by Dr Natalya Vince is out now with Manchester University Press. Between 1954 and 1962, Algerian women played a major role in the struggle to end French rule in one of the most violent wars of decolonisation of the twentieth century. Our Fighting Sisters is the first in-depth exploration of what happened to these women after independence in 1962. Based on new oral history interviews with women who participated in the war in a wide range of roles, from members of the Algiers urban bomb network to women who supported the rural guerrilla, the book explores how female veterans viewed the post-independence state and its multiple discourses on ‘the Algerian woman’ in the fifty years following 1962, from the euphoria of national liberation to the civil violence of the 1990s. It also examines the ways in which these former combatants’ memories of the anti-colonial conflict intertwine with, contradict or coexist alongside the state-sponsored narrative of the war constructed after independence. Part of an emerging field of works seeking to write the post-independence Algerian history, this book aims to go beyond reading Algeria through the lens of post-colonial trauma or through a series […]

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Fully Funded Arts and Humanities Research Council Collaborative PhD Studentship English in Algeria: Interdisciplinary Perspective

University of Portsmouth School of Languages and Area Studies with the British Council, Algiers Application deadline: Friday 1 May 2015 Interviews expected w/b 18 May 2015 Start date: 1 October 2015 Project description This studentship presents a unique opportunity to complete a PhD in an emerging research area and develop highly transferable skills by working both within a university environment and as part of a non-academic international organisation. The studentship project examines the place of English within the contemporary Algerian linguistic and cultural landscape. It explores the historical, political, economic and social contexts which shape learners’ motivation to study English, identifying new directions in research into shifts in global connections and perceptions of what has traditionally been termed ‘Francophone Africa’. It also seeks to provide the basis for more research-informed policy-making, enabling the British Council to better focus its work encouraging UK-Algerian co-operation and partnership, including study in the UK, and better direct its English provision for both students and teachers. Applications for this studentship are welcome from anyone with a strong academic track record EITHER in the field of language and linguistics (especially educational psychology, applied linguistics or language teaching) OR in the field of Algerian or North African area studies (history, politics, cultures or […]

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