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Call for panelists ECAS 2019 (Edinburgh): Archives, governance and policy-making on the African continent

  Call for Panellists Archives, governance and policy-making on the African continent ECAS 2019 (Edinburgh)     Vincent Hiribarren (King’s College) and Fabienne Chamelot (Portsmouth) are convening a panel for the next European Conference of African Studies (ECAS) in Edinburgh (12-14 June 2019). We are looking for papers on the relationship between archives and good governance, the recent digitisation of African archives or the concept of archival decolonisation. Our panel seeks to reflect on the archival practices in relation to governing and nation-building. Essential to accountability and transparency, archives are also crucial to the support of a national narrative and to connecting people together within a state. With the rise of digital technology and globalisation, their role as governing tools is all the more important, both perpetuating and prompting new approaches to citizenship and state. For instance, while colonial archives often symbolise a disruption in the national history, the wave of archival digitisation that the African continent currently undergoes seems to offer opportunities to revisit access to governmental and historical records and documents. Yet these issues prompt important questions which go from intellectual property to sovereignty, not to mention economic stakes or recent initiatives to decolonise archives. If you would […]

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CALL FOR PAPERS – A crisis in ‘coming to terms with the past’?

Call for Papers A crisis in ‘coming to terms with the past’? At the crossroads of translation and memory 1-2 February 2019 Senate House, London Over the past decade, a particular notion of ‘coming to terms with the past’, usually associated with an international liberal consensus, has increasingly been challenged. Growing in strength since the 1980s, this consensus has been underpinned by the idea that difficult historical legacies, displaced into the present, and persisting as patterns of thought, speech and behaviour, needed to be addressed through a range of phenomena such as transitional justice, reconciliation, and the forging of shared narratives to ensure social cohesion and shore up democratic norms. Such official and international memory practices tended to privilege top-down cosmopolitan memory in an attempt to counter the bottom-up, still antagonistic memories associated with supposedly excessive effusions of nationalism. In a context of the global rise of populist nationalisms and of uncertainty linked by some politicians to migration, this tendency is increasingly being challenged, capitalizing on populist memory practices evident since the 1980s and creating what might be seen as a crisis in this liberal approach to ‘coming to terms with the past’. Yet rather than rejecting a politics based […]

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