Connected Histories of Decolonisation Workshop, Senate House, 13-14 November 2014

Connected Histories of Decolonisation  A two-day workshop organised by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies in conjunction with the Centre for European and International Studies Research at the University of Portsmouth and King’s College London The Senate Room, Senate House (First Floor) ****  Thursday 13th November 2014 11-11.30: Coffee and welcome 11.30-13.00: Panel 1 – Creating spaces, connections and networks of resistance Clemens Hoffmann (Bilkent University) – Anti-colonial empires and the creation of Afroasian spaces of resistance James Renton (Edge Hill) – The Theatre of the anti-colonial nation: colonial Asia in the age of nationality Uma Kothari (University of Manchester) – Contesting colonial rule: transnational networks of resistance and the politics of exile 13.00-14.00: Lunch 14.00-15.30: Panel 2 – Competing narratives of decolonisation Andrew Kuech (The New School of Social Research, New York) – Duelling Chinese nationalism: a postcolonial confrontation with American power Tim Livsey (King’s College London) – Connected histories of decolonisation and development: the United States, Britain and African universities Robert S. G. Fletcher (University of Exeter) – Decolonisation and the arid world 15.30-16.00: Tea  16.00-17:30: Panel 3 – Connected histories of nationalism Thomas Sharp (Oxford Brookes) – A transnational nationalism: the UPC and the decolonisation of Cameroon, 1948-1961 […]

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New book announcement – We are no longer in France: Communists in colonial Algeria by Allison Drew

This new book by Professor Allison Drew (University of York) recovers the lost history of colonial Algeria’s communist movement. Meticulously researched – and the only English-language book on the Parti Communiste Algérien – it explores communism’s complex relationship with Algerian nationalism. During international crises, such as the Popular Front and Second World War years, the PCA remained close to its French counterpart, but as the national liberation struggle intensified, the PCA’s concern with political and social justice attracted growing numbers of Muslims. When the Front de Libération Nationale launched armed struggle in November 1954, the PCA maintained its organisational autonomy – despite FLN pressure. They participated fully in the national liberation war, facing the French state’s wrath. Independence saw two conflicting socialist visions, with the PCA’s incorporated political pluralism and class struggle on the one hand, and the FLN demand for a one-party socialist state on the other. The PCA’s pluralist vision was shattered when it was banned by the one-party state in November 1962. This book is of particular interest to students and scholars of Algerian history, French colonial history and communist history. For more information and details on how to purchase this book, please visit the Manchester University Press website.

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