Tag Archives | African studies

CFP: 21st Century Resiliency: Sustainable Development and U.S.-Africa Relations

The Southeastern Regional Seminar in African Studies (SERSAS) and the SouthEast Africanist Network (SEAN) are pleased to announce a joint conference to be hosted by the College of Charleston on Friday evening and Saturday, February 3-4, 2017, in historic downtown Charleston, SC.  Some funds for lodging will be provided to participants; details to follow. SERSAS/SEAN Spring 2017 Conference  || College of Charleston, 3-4 February Sustainable Development has garnered increased attention and support in recent years in the West, but has long been applicable to Africa, where many countries are witnessing declines in poverty and hunger, and improvements in national economies. This is therefore a propitious time to reflect on Africa’s social and economic trajectories, in the past, present and future.  In what ways do African examples reflect possibilities for a more resilient world?  At the same time, the United States is just emerging from a bruising presidential election in which Africa did not play a notable role in public debates, and the president-elect has evidenced little interest in, and even less knowledge of, Africa.  How are his proposed policies, to the extent that there are any, likely to affect given countries or regions in Africa? The conference keynote lecture will be […]

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Morocco Rising : Behind the Demonstrations in Morocco – by Richard Greeman

Morocco Rising : Behind the Demonstrations in Morocco By Richard Greeman On Wednesday Oct. 26, the well-known Moroccan historian and human rights activist Maâti Monjib and five of his colleagues were hauled into the High Court at Rabat to answer charges of “attacks on national security” and “receiving foreign funds.” They are facing up to five years in prison for their activities as investigative journalists, human rights advocates and members of the “February 20th Movement” — the Moroccan version of “Arab Spring” of 2011. Two days later, anti-government demonstrations spread across Morocco after social media spread the story of  Mousine Fikri, a fishmonger crushed to death inside a garbage truck as he tried to block the destruction of a truckload of his fish confiscated by police. The February 20th Movement, long assumed dormant, sprang back to life and took the lead in organizing the protests, which spread to 40 cities. These two events – the Monjib trial and the demonstrations sweeping the country — are hardly unrelated. Monjib and his co-defendants, journalists, media activists, and fighters for human rights, were already a thorn in the side of the regime even before the 2011 rising. Since then they and their colleagues […]

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