Tag Archives | Algerian war

IJFS special issue: Progress, change and development: Francophone perspectives

The first issue of the year (19/1) of the International Journal of Francophone Studies, edited by Margaret Majumdar and Fabienne Chamelot, addresses Francophone perspectives on Progress, change and development. “While the perspectives underlying these texts are very different, what unites the subject matter is the underlying preoccupation with history as progress. While some accept the ideals of modernity, freedom and economic, social, political amelioration and focus their critique on the deficiencies of their implementation to date, others channel their work more to unpicking the unintended effects of historical change, challenging received wisdom to date and the analysing the cultural processes and products through which many of the ensuing contradictions are articulated.” Here is the table of content. More details here: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=3140/ Progress, change and development: Francophone perspectives Fabienne Chamelot And  Margaret A. Majumdar Tunisian internal autonomy and the transformation of the French colonial empire Ryo Ikeda Algérie: Libération nationale et construction de la nation Catherine Lévy L’Algérie: La postindépendance, l’effervescence cosmopolite et la littérature Authors:  Beïda Chikhi Transformations institutionnelles et développement économique dans la zone franc en Afrique de l’Ouest (1960–1990) Authors:  Vincent Duchaussoy Reading between the lines: Identity issues in Kanak narratives and the agency of the storyteller Authors:  Catherine O’Connell […]

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“The Battle of Algiers” at 50: From 1960s Radicalism to the Classrooms of West Point

By Madeleine Dobie (Professor of French at Columbia University) Originally published on The Los Angeles Review of Books website at https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/battle-algiers-50-1960s-radicalism-classrooms-west-point/#! THIS MONTH The Battle of Algiers turns 50. But Gillo Pontecorvo’s acclaimed movie about the Algerian people’s fight for liberation from French colonialism shows little sign of aging. Often described as a “classic” that has “stood the test of time,” the film has been acknowledged as an influence on everyone from the Black Panthers and the Red Army Faction to the military juntas of the Southern Cone. It may, however, have had the greatest impact in the United States, where it has appealed both to scholars of colonial and postcolonial history, such as myself, and to members of the military and defense community. A screening of the film at the Pentagon in August 2003 unleashed a small media storm, as journalists reacted with skepticism and scorn: was the Bush administration at such a loss in Iraq that it needed to draw lessons from a 40-year-old Italian movie? “It seems far too late for Mr. Bush to begin studying about counterinsurgency now that Iraq has cratered into civil war,” opined Maureen Dowd. “Can’t someone get the president a copy of Gone […]

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