Tag Archives | Colonial past

How colonial violence came home: the ugly truth of the First World War

The Great War is often depicted as an unexpected catastrophe. But for millions who had been living under imperialist rule, terror and degradation were nothing new.  Today on the Western Front,” the German sociologist Max Weber wrote in September 1917, there “stands a dross of African and Asiatic savages and all the world’s rabble of thieves and lumpens.” Weber was referring to the millions of Indian, African, Arab, Chinese and Vietnamese soldiers and labourers, who were then fighting with British and French forces in Europe, as well as in several ancillary theatres of the first world war. Read more The article was originally published in The Guardian.

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‘Narrating Migrations’ workshop: Martin Evans

On 15 March 2017 a workshop took place in the School of Languages and Area Studies of the University of Portsmouth entitled ‘Narrating migrations’. Organized by Emmanuel Godin and Ed Naylor, and supported by the Leverhulme Trust and the University of Portsmouth, the event aimed to explore how migration and migrant experiences are represented in Europe today beyond the news media and academia. Three invited speakers presented their work on this theme in the domains of museum curation, literature and documentary film-making respectively. Their talks were recorded and will be featured as podcasts on the blog over the coming weeks along with further details about their projects. Professor Martin Evans (University of Sussex, @HAHP_Sussex) kicked off the proceedings. Martin Evans is currently curating an exhibition “Paris-London – Two Global Cities” which will open in October 2018 at the Musée d’histoire de l’immigration in Paris. The exhibition will consider how Paris and London have been transformed by global migration since the end of empire. With a particular emphasis on music, but also literature, poetry, theatre, painting photography and film, the Exhibition seeks to open up new comparative perspectives between the two cities as global and (post)imperial capitals. In his talk he […]

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