Tag Archives | Colonial past

‘Narrating Migrations’ workshop: Martin Evans

On 15 March 2017 a workshop took place in the School of Languages and Area Studies of the University of Portsmouth entitled ‘Narrating migrations’. Organized by Emmanuel Godin and Ed Naylor, and supported by the Leverhulme Trust and the University of Portsmouth, the event aimed to explore how migration and migrant experiences are represented in Europe today beyond the news media and academia. Three invited speakers presented their work on this theme in the domains of museum curation, literature and documentary film-making respectively. Their talks were recorded and will be featured as podcasts on the blog over the coming weeks along with further details about their projects. Professor Martin Evans (University of Sussex, @HAHP_Sussex) kicked off the proceedings. Martin Evans is currently curating an exhibition “Paris-London – Two Global Cities” which will open in October 2018 at the Musée d’histoire de l’immigration in Paris. The exhibition will consider how Paris and London have been transformed by global migration since the end of empire. With a particular emphasis on music, but also literature, poetry, theatre, painting photography and film, the Exhibition seeks to open up new comparative perspectives between the two cities as global and (post)imperial capitals. In his talk he […]

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The Forgotten Cameroon War : Tens of thousands dead behind the sunny view of France’s colonial past.

French officials like to project a sunny view of their country’s colonial past. Tens of thousands dead in Cameroon would tell a different story. by Thomas Deltombe Journalist, editor, and the co-author of Kamerun! and La Guerre du Cameroun. France’s agonizing over its identity has recently taken a shocking turn. Almost daily, some editorialist, politician, or writer celebrates the country’s “colonial endeavor.” In September, former president Nicolas Sarkozy resurrected one of the most hackneyed and racist clichés of the colonial period when he insisted that the “ancient Gauls” are the ancestors of all French people, whatever their origins. A few days earlier, former prime minister François Fillon described colonization as the simple “sharing of culture.” Ignoring the millions of corpses French colonialism left in its wake, he declared: “France is not guilty for having wanted to share its culture with the peoples of Africa, Asia, and North America.” This trend, unfortunately, has a precedent. In 2005, parliament adopted a law requiring history teachers to discuss the “positive aspects” of colonization. Of course, this has always been done: many French colonial atrocities have been erased, and the driving forces of imperialism are rarely, if ever, critically examined. School curricula propagate a […]

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