Tag Archives | conflict

Preventing extremism in West and Central Africa Lessons from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Mali, Niger and Nigeria

Efforts aimed at preventing and countering violent extremism (P/CVE) have emerged onto the global stage with unprecedented speed and attracted substantial financial investment. This is unsurprising – the idea that action can be taken to eliminate the potential for devastating violence before it is perpetrated brings great hope and inspiration. While efforts to contain terrorist violence continue on other fronts – military, security, and criminal justice – P/CVE offers the potential to address factors directly associated with extremism and to energise action to address structural and development problems that contribute to the grievances associated with extremist actions. The past few years have witnessed the rapid expansion of P/CVE initiatives. This has been enabled by significant financial investments from international donors combined with actions by local individuals and organisations to address the problems that affect them. High expectations have been created for P/CVE, notwithstanding its obvious complexities and on-going debates about the meaning of the concept, its range and scope, and its expected outcomes. Global, regional and national policies offer substantive guidance on the content and actions that could be taken. However, a great deal depends on the translation of the theories and ideas associated with P/CVE into practical efforts, and how […]

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ICG: Making the Central African Republic’s Latest Peace Agreement Stick

A deal to end six years of war in the Central African Republic could come unglued if not strengthened. The government should hold signatory armed groups accountable to criteria for improved behaviour and back local peace initiatives. Neighbours should push armed groups to cease provocations. What’s new? In February, the Central African Republic’s government signed an agreement with armed groups that control large swathes of the country, committing to integrating some groups’ fighters into new army units and their leaders into government. The deal has galvanised international support, but violence continues in the provinces. Why does it matter? The government, African Union and UN have invested heavily in this agreement, which has the buy-in of neighbours. With strong fol-low-up in-country there is a chance of starting to reverse six years of widespread violence. What should be done? The government should set clear benchmarks for armed group behaviour; it should eject from government leaders of groups that fail to meet them. The government and international actors should support local peace initiatives. Chad and Sudan should use their influence over armed groups to end their abuses. Executive Summary Four months after the government of the Central African Republic (CAR) signed an African Union (AU)-sponsored peace […]

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