Tag Archives | Decolonisation

LECTURE. Red Globalism: The ‘Other’ Europe, Africa and Decolonization, Prof Paul Betts

CEISR ANNUAL LECTURE Red Globalism: The ‘Other’ Europe, Africa and Decolonization by Prof Paul Betts, University of Oxford   Professor Paul Betts is Professor of Modern European History in St Anthony’s College at the University of Oxford. His research and publications focus on Modern European Cultural History in general and 20th Century German History in particular.  Professor Betts has a special interest in the relationship between culture and politics over the course of the century, and have worked on the themes of material culture, cultural diplomacy, photography, memory and nostalgia, human rights and international justice, death and changing notions of private life. His recent publications include Within Walls:  Private Life in the German Democratic Republic (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010; paperback, 2012), which was awarded the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History by the Wiener Library. Professor Betts has also co-edited a number of volumes recently, including Heritage in the Modern World:  Historical Preservation in International Perspective (with Corey Ross, Oxford University Press, 2015); Years of Persecution, Years of Extermination: Saul Friedländer and the Future of Holocaust Studies (with Christian Wiese, London: Continuum, 2010); and  Between Mass Death and Individual Loss: The Place of the Dead in Twentieth-Century Germany (with Alon Confino and Dirk Schumann, New York/Oxford: […]

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Challenging the myth of colonial to post-colonial: The case of the Organisation Commune des Régions Sahariennes

An exploration of the Organisation Commune des Régions Sahariennes (OCRS), introduced by the French government in the 1950s, as a case study of Eurafrica in practice, provides an original entry to the complex dynamics of the end of the French empire. Through an examination of the paths considered but not taken by the colonial elites, Kelsey Suggitt, a PhD student at the University of Portsmouth and a member of the Francophone Africa cluster, challenges the myth of the inevitability of decolonisation.   In early September I made the 300 mile or so trek up to the University of Hull for the Association for Modern and Contemporary France’s (ASMCF) Annual Conference. The theme of the conference was ‘Myth Making’, something which resonates within my PhD project. For the past year, since I started working towards my PhD, I have been re-examining how decolonisation was imagined by French colonial elites during the late colonial period in North and West Africa. One myth which I have been exploring is the idea that decolonisation was either a peaceful transition, from colonies to nation-states, as in the case of French West Africa, or a violent conflict like the Algerian War. I also question myths that […]

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