Tag Archives | diaspora

‘Narrating Migrations’ workshop: Martin Evans

On 15 March 2017 a workshop took place in the School of Languages and Area Studies of the University of Portsmouth entitled ‘Narrating migrations’. Organized by Emmanuel Godin and Ed Naylor, and supported by the Leverhulme Trust and the University of Portsmouth, the event aimed to explore how migration and migrant experiences are represented in Europe today beyond the news media and academia. Three invited speakers presented their work on this theme in the domains of museum curation, literature and documentary film-making respectively. Their talks were recorded and will be featured as podcasts on the blog over the coming weeks along with further details about their projects. Professor Martin Evans (University of Sussex, @HAHP_Sussex) kicked off the proceedings. Martin Evans is currently curating an exhibition “Paris-London – Two Global Cities” which will open in October 2018 at the Musée d’histoire de l’immigration in Paris. The exhibition will consider how Paris and London have been transformed by global migration since the end of empire. With a particular emphasis on music, but also literature, poetry, theatre, painting photography and film, the Exhibition seeks to open up new comparative perspectives between the two cities as global and (post)imperial capitals. In his talk he […]

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The Liberated Africans Project has been launched!

The Liberated Africans Project provides historical resources and data related to transatlantic slave trade. Between 1808 and 1868, officers, primarily from the British navy, captured hundreds of slave ships and brought them into this network of mixed commissions. During the six decades known as the ‘illegal slave trade era’, these international courts liberated upwards of 200,000 people. However, this united effort had a limited impact on the overall suppression of the trans-Atlantic slave trade because an estimated 2.6 million people still crossed the Atlantic in this period with the majority landing in Brazil (1.8 million), followed by Cuba (685,000). According to the treaties, the mixed commissions could condemn a slave ship for re-sale, but the courts could not exact penalties on the owners, captains, and crew, who in many cases returned to the lucrative business on the same ship. Although Great Britain emancipated slaves in their colonies in 1834, most other nations did not abolish slavery in the Americas until much later: this included France and Denmark in 1848, the Netherlands in 1863, the United States in 1865, Cuba in 1886, and Brazil in 1888. These courts produced extensive documentation about tens of thousands of people victimized by the trans-Atlantic […]

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