Tag Archives | ethics

“Narrating Migrations”(3) Jakob Preuss, director of WHEN PAUL CAME OVER THE SEA: JOURNAL OF AN ENCOUNTER

In the second podcast from the workshop ‘Narrating Migrations’, held at the University of Portsmouth on 15 March 2017, documentary-filmmaker Jakob Preuss talks about his experiences filming When Paul Came Over the Sea (2017). The film charts the growth of an unusual but very real friendship in the context of the ongoing migration crisis in the Mediterranean.  The film shows Paul, who has made his way from his home in Cameroon across the Sahara to the Moroccan coast where he now lives in a forest waiting for the right moment to cross the Mediterranean. This is where he meets Jakob, a filmmaker from Berlin, who is filming along Europe’s borders. Soon afterwards, Paul manages to cross over to Spain on a rubber boat. He survives – but half of his companions die on this tragic 50 hour odyssey. Held for two months in a deportation centre, upon his release Paul meets Jakob again at a shelter for migrants in Southern Spain. When Paul decides to continue on to Germany, Jakob has to make a choice: will he become an active part of Paul’s pursuit of a better life or remain a detached documentary filmmaker?     Jakob Preuss is a documentary […]

Continue Reading 0

October Interview: Charlotte Sefton* talks about her research into the role of gender in diasporic experience.

*Charlotte Sefton is currently doing her PhD at the University of Exeter and conducting fieldwork with Sudanese women in her hometown of Portsmouth. After coming from an undergraduate background in Arabic and French language, Charlotte moved into Middle East Studies for her MA and MRes with a particular focus on Gender Studies. With the Sudanese community in Portsmouth, Charlotte’s research focuses on the role of gender in diasporic experience, with a particular interest in ritual practice. From a wider research-philosophy perspective,Charlotte is most concerned with interrogating the (in)ability of mainstream feminist theory (being western and academic) to apply to non-western ‘other’ women and with encouraging the need for intersectional understandings of the complexity of women’s lives and experiences. UoP_Francophone:    How did you come about your research project to interrogate the (in)ability of mainstream feminist theory to apply to non-western ‘other’ women? Charlotte:  I was doing the module on gender identity and modernity and I just decided to go ahead with that for my BA and I looked at the gender and religious rituals in the Hezbollah resistance community in Lebanon. From there, seeing the ways in which crisis shook up the notion of what gender (especially women gender) truly was in gender roles and expectations, I […]

Continue Reading 0