Tag Archives | History

Call for panelists ECAS 2019 (Edinburgh): Archives, governance and policy-making on the African continent

  Call for Panellists Archives, governance and policy-making on the African continent ECAS 2019 (Edinburgh)     Vincent Hiribarren (King’s College) and Fabienne Chamelot (Portsmouth) are convening a panel for the next European Conference of African Studies (ECAS) in Edinburgh (12-14 June 2019). We are looking for papers on the relationship between archives and good governance, the recent digitisation of African archives or the concept of archival decolonisation. Our panel seeks to reflect on the archival practices in relation to governing and nation-building. Essential to accountability and transparency, archives are also crucial to the support of a national narrative and to connecting people together within a state. With the rise of digital technology and globalisation, their role as governing tools is all the more important, both perpetuating and prompting new approaches to citizenship and state. For instance, while colonial archives often symbolise a disruption in the national history, the wave of archival digitisation that the African continent currently undergoes seems to offer opportunities to revisit access to governmental and historical records and documents. Yet these issues prompt important questions which go from intellectual property to sovereignty, not to mention economic stakes or recent initiatives to decolonise archives. If you would […]

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The English in 17th-Century Tangier, Ottoman History Podcast: Episode 388

The English in 17th-Century Tangier Download the podcast Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud Tangier is in the midst of a massive renovation and expansion — a new ferry and cruise port, a duty-free zone, and the massive Tangier Med shipping facility all meant to make the city and Morocco into a critical juncture of the global flows of goods, people, services, and capital. Of course, Tangier’s proximity to Europe and position astride the Strait of Gibraltar has long provided it with a cosmopolitan, international character, typified by the International Zone days during European colonial rule of Morocco in the first half of the twentieth century. But Tangier’s polyglot, imperial past goes back much further. In this episode, we turn to one of those more distant episodes: the English occupation of Tangier from 1661 to 1684. It was a brief interlude: control of the city itself was part of Catherine of Braganza’s dowry to King Charles II, but English forces quickly found the situation (under intermittent but heavy resistance from local Moroccan tribes) unsustainable. The period produced some interesting characters on both sides–Samuel Pepys, for one, was a resident–but has generally been overlooked by scholars in favor of the Portuguese imperial enclaves on the Atlantic […]

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