Tag Archives | immigration

CEISR SEMINAR: Me And ‘Other’ Women: Intersubjectivity In Cross Cultural Feminist Research

Location : University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, room 2.14 Date : 27 September 2016,  5- 6.30pm by Charlotte Sefton, University of Exeter Charlotte Sefton is currently conducting fieldwork with Sudanese women in her hometown of Portsmouth. After coming from an undergraduate background in Arabic and French language, Charlotte moved into Middle East Studies for her MA and MRes with a particular focus on Gender Studies. With the Sudanese community in Portsmouth, Charlotte’s research focuses on the role of gender in diasporic experience, with a particular interest in ritual practice. From a wider research-philosophy perspective, Charlotte is most concerned with interrogating the (in)ability of mainstream feminist theory (being western and academic) to apply to non-western ‘other’ women and with encouraging the need for intersectional understandings of the complexity of women’s lives and experiences.

Continue Reading 0

Neo-republicanism in contemporary France. Interview with Emile Chabal

Ed Naylor interviewed Emile Chabal on the occasion of the launch of his book, A Divided Republic. In this interview, Emile Chabal discusses the concept of neo-republicanism as a renewed and emerging version of the 19th century republicanism used in the 1980s. He also offers an analysis of postcolonial politics in France as opposed to postcolonialism in the Anglo-American world. Dr Emile Chabal is a Chancellor’s Fellow in History at the University of Edinburgh. His research focuses on the transformation of French politics since the 1970s, Franco-British relations in the 20th century and the legacy of postcolonialism in France. In addition to French studies, his next research project will be the intellectual biography of Eric Hobsbawm. Dr Ed Naylor is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the University of Portsmouth. His research engages with history of immigration on France, with a special focus on Marseille.  

Continue Reading 0