Tag Archives | narrative studies

Being Human Festival in Portsmouth. Port city: narratives of migration

Series summary Portsmouth tends to be associated with the history of the Navy, and there is a mistaken perception that it is a monocultural city. With its lectures, walk, workshop, exhibition and readings on migration, ‘Port city: narratives of migration’ aims to dispel this notion. Drinking tea to escape the noise of the world | Friday 13 November The event starts with a presentation of the ‘Tea Project’ exhibition exploring aspects of the personal, political and collective histories related to the tea trade and migration. This will be followed by a talk on tea trade and migration by Portsmouth’s own local tea merchant. Portsmouth sailortown walk | Saturday 14 November This walk will explore the unique culture and representation of three sailortowns of Portsmouth that evolved between the 18th and early 20th centuries. Engaging with the past: migration memories | Tuesday 17 November A special guest lecture by Eithne Nightingale (Queen Mary University London) on her research into ‘migration museums’ in port towns, followed by a reading and discussion group on the theme of ‘migration museums’. Reviving the Crescent: Portsmouth connects with Asia | Wednesday 18 November Presenting a very different narrative, creative and cultural industries lecturer Tom Sykes will discuss Portsmouth’s role as […]

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A Syrian Love Story: narration of a subject or subjects of narration?

The critically acclaimed documentary, A Syrian Love Story, by Sean McAllister, follows a couple of ‘refugees’ from Syria, and their children, through their journey to France. The film-maker’s choice of a personal standpoint to show their story provides multidimensional insights into their lives and the emotional and intellectual toll of displacement. But while this inspired film challenges stereotypes usually endured by refugees, Camille Jacob, PhD student and member of the Francophone Africa cluster, wonders about the narrative it offers.   Sean McAllister’s documentary of the relationship between a Syrian and a Palestinian activist through the Arab Springs, revolution, civil war and displacement is timely and pertinent. However, its main strength lies in moving away from the one-dimensional show of the atrocities of the civil war and focusing purely on the family. Amer and Raghda met and fell in love in prison; after their release they married and had children. Raghda wrote a book about their story, which landed her back into prison. As filming starts, Amer is anxiously trying to bring her home, and hopes that accepting to be filmed will hasten the process. We intermittently follow the trials of the family for five years as they move fifteen times, […]

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