Tag Archives | power

Empires of the Mind: A book that was supposed to stop Brexit – An Interview with Professor Robert Gildea

  Megan Ison is a PhD student funded by the ESRC South Coast Doctoral Training Partnership. Her research looks at Alsace and the politics of memory at the commemorative site of Oradour-sur-Glane, France.   Empires of the Mind: A book that was supposed to stop Brexit   An Interview with Professor Robert Gildea Is there any better way to cheer oneself up on a cold day in the depths of British winter, than with a trip to Oxford University to talk about Brexit? Quite frankly, I can think of many. This is because Brexit is as bleak a reality for us British Mug[gle]s as was the prospect of Lord Voldemort securing unmatched power in J.K. Rowling’s fictional world of Harry Potter. In fact, are you even British if visiting the Great Hall at Christ Church isn’t at the top of your list of sites to visit in Oxford? Indeed, Harry Potter is basically Britannica. Well, I haven’t read Harry Potter, or even watched the films. Maybe the Home Office will take my passport away for not assimilating into British culture. The same government department that a few years ago senselessly denied that the Windrush generation truly belonged after 70 years […]

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Call for Papers: ASMCF–SSFH Postgraduate Study Day 2020

Call for papers 7 March 2020 – The Graduate School, Queen’s University, Belfast Keynote: Dr Hannah Grayson, University of Stirling « Chaque parole a des retentissements. Chaque silence aussi. » Jean-Paul Sartre, ‘Présentation des Temps modernes’, in Situation II (1948) Where dominant groups form in societies and start to define their own coherent narrative, this may become the rule by which the past, present and future should be written, remembered and represented. This multi-causal and multidirectional process inevitably leads to the construction, circulation and legitimisation of a ‘master narrative’ that, once institutionalised, limits opportunity for further/different/alternative interpretations to be expressed publicly. But beneath and around these loud voices exist many others which are often neglected, ignored, or actively suppressed and silenced. Crucially, many scholars working in and across the myriad of disciplines that constitute French Studies and French History, are giving parole to these peripheral narratives and allowing marginalised voices to be heard in and beyond France. This Study Day seeks to bring together postgraduates ready to aim their cobble stones and break the silences that persist in all areas of French Studies, focusing on the period 1789 to the present. We invite proposals for ​20-minute papers in English or […]

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