Tag Archives | terrorism

« Contestations islamisées : le Sénégal, entre diplomatie d’influence et islam politique » Bakary Sambe

    Bakary Sambe: “Senegal is experiencing the geopolitical paradox of being, at one and the same time, the continuum and sub-Saharan depth of the Arab-Muslim world and a traditional strategic partner of the Western powers. Long penetrated by the ideological trends that fuel political Islam, it remains, for the time being, an “island of stability in an ocean of instability” at the heart of political and security developments in West Africa. In the Sahel where these same Western powers and those of the Arab-Persian Gulf are in search of unrestrained oases of influence. The Islamist political disputes and the old claims for the recognition of the “Arabophonie” of a country-symbol of the “Francophonie” are at the heart of this book exposing the socio-political vulnerabilities of Senegal, often hidden, facing an elite struggle with contradictory socialisations”. Bakary Sambe provides a detailed analysis of these burning issues in a context where the tense security situation, the rise of extremism and the dangers linked to transnational terrorism paradoxically impose on the “secular” states of the region and elsewhere management of the religious. Read More  

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Explainer: the role of foreign military forces in Niger

Niger is one of the most militarised countries in Africa. In November 2017, this came to wider notice when four American Special Forces soldiers and at least four of their Nigerien counterparts died in an ambush. Since then, the military presence has only intensified. Why are these forces there, whose interests are they serving and are they having the impact that was intended? The US is not the only nation with a military presence in Niger. France, Germany, Canadaand Italy also have troops in the West African country. In April this year, Niger hosted Exercise Flintlock, a military exercise that brought together 1900 troops from more than 20 partner countries. Sponsored by the US, it purported to develop capacity and collaboration among African security forces to protect civilians against violent religious extremism. Three main reasons are given for this military presence: countering terrorism, preventing migration of Africans to Europe, and protecting foreign investments. Read more Originally published on The Conversation

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