Remembering Rwanda

In this post, Rob Coates, a former student on the MA Francophone Africa programme, recalls his recent trip to Rwanda, where he spent three months working at the Commission Nationale de Lutte Contre le Génocide (CNLG) in Kigali. Rob recently submitted his MA Francophone Africa dissertation on commemoration, textbooks and music as means of post-genocide reconciliation in Rwanda.  My first impressions of Rwanda are a bit blurred. My flight out had been disrupted by, of all things, a leaking toilet and so, when finally I touched down in Kigali, I was only capable of forming simple greeting sentences, and watching the whirl of colour fly past the car window. Luckily, by the time I met Damas, the guy I would be working with at the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG), I had been able to sleep and came across much better for it. For the remaining three months in Kigali, I would develop enough memories to compensate for the addlement and confusion of the first few days. Gorillas Damas runs, almost singlehandedly, the Research and Documentation Centre at CNLG, responsible for carrying out local research projects and ensuring that Rwanda safeguards written and recorded proofs relating to the genocide against […]

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Podcast: Natalya Vince on 1960s Algeria: Women, Public Space and Moral Panic

As recent events in North Africa have demonstrated, the post-revolution is often accompanied by moral panic and a desire to ‘reinstate’ gendered order. On Wednesday 12 November 2014, Dr. Natalya Vince gave a talk at the LSE Middle East Centre, entitled ‘1960s Algeria: Women, Public Space and Moral Panic‘, which explored debates about the place of women in public space in Algeria in the 1960s. Seeking to go beyond commonly-held views of post-independence Algeria as locked in a binary struggle between, on the one hand, ‘tradition’ and ethno-cultural nationalism and, on the other hand ‘modernity’ and socialist development, Dr Vince considered how revolutionary progress could embrace puritanical single-mindedness and also how Algerian women in the 1960s responded to and contributed to these debates. A full podcast of Dr. Vince’s talk is now available: video placeholder                     We are grateful to the LSE Middle East Centre for producing this podcast and granting us permission to share it on our blog.

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