Tag Archives | Empire

CONFERENCE. Empire, Labour, Citizenship. Current research on Globalization.

Brussels, 18-20 November 2015 Since the second half of the 19th century, accelerations in the processes of globalization profoundly transformed human communities throughout the world. This event aims at highlighting current research in human sciences around concepts of empire, labour and citizenship and their connections with the long-term history of mankind. During three days, researchers in history, anthropology and political sciences are invited to reflect together on how political superstructures, workforce management and the making of collective identities contributed to shape today’s globalized societies. The conference will be closed by a lecture of Pr. Frederick Cooper (New York University), a leading scholar in the History of (post)colonial Africa, and a major contributor to academic debates on these topics. Day 1. 18 November. Venue: Vrije Universiteit Brussel, room to be confirmed. 12h-13h. Welcoming and registration. 13h-13h15. Welcome speech: Benoît Henriet (PhD candidate, Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Romain Tiquet (PhD Candidate – Humboldt University – Berlin). Panel 1. Empires and the making of global societies. Discussant/chair : Pr. Kenneth Bertrams (Université Libre de Bruxelles). 13h15-14h45 KEYNOTE : Pr. Eric Vanhaute (Ghent University): ‘Frontiers of Empire. About Land, Labour and Commodities’. 14h45-15h. Coffee break. 15h-15h30. Pr. Paul Fontaine (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles) : […]

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cfp: Re-imagining ends of empire

The study of the ends of empires and decolonisation has generally focused on the passage from empire to nation-states. Whether this process was violent or relatively peaceful, it has generally been presented as historically inevitable. This is particularly the case with France’s African empire which is often studied in terms of its attempt and failure to hold on at all costs before ultimately giving up (Algeria) or its ‘successful’ negotiation of a smooth transfer of power to a Westernised African elite (West Africa). As Todd Shepard underlined in 2006 in The Invention of Decolonisation, by 1959-60, decolonisation in France was presented as part of the “tide of history” with little explanation or discussion of what this actually meant. He underlines that this historical determinism has largely been reproduced in academic literature. At the same time, an emerging trend has been to re-examine established accounts of the passage of empires to nation-states (Cooper, 2014; Hansen and Jonsson, 2014; Deighton, 2006). With an increase in studies of global and transnational history, scholars are increasingly questioning the inevitability of how (post) empire was reimagined by the late colonial state. This study day at the University of Portsmouth on March 2nd 2016 aims to […]

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