Empires of the Mind: A book that was supposed to stop Brexit – An Interview with Professor Robert Gildea

  Megan Ison is a PhD student funded by the ESRC South Coast Doctoral Training Partnership. Her research looks at Alsace and the politics of memory at the commemorative site of Oradour-sur-Glane, France.   Empires of the Mind: A book that was supposed to stop Brexit   An Interview with Professor Robert Gildea Is there any better way to cheer oneself up on a cold day in the depths of British winter, than with a trip to Oxford University to talk about Brexit? Quite frankly, I can think of many. This is because Brexit is as bleak a reality for us British Mug[gle]s as was the prospect of Lord Voldemort securing unmatched power in J.K. Rowling’s fictional world of Harry Potter. In fact, are you even British if visiting the Great Hall at Christ Church isn’t at the top of your list of sites to visit in Oxford? Indeed, Harry Potter is basically Britannica. Well, I haven’t read Harry Potter, or even watched the films. Maybe the Home Office will take my passport away for not assimilating into British culture. The same government department that a few years ago senselessly denied that the Windrush generation truly belonged after 70 years […]

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Call for panel contributions : The social production of war veterans in Africa, 20th-21st centuries. Identity processes and political re-mobilization

Call for panel contributions : The social production of war veterans in Africa, 20th-21st centuries. Identity processes and political re-mobilization Call for panel contributions, Vereinigung für Afrikawissenschaften in Deutschland (VAD), Africa Challenges, Frankfurt, 22-25 september 2020 Panel 28 : The social production of war veterans in Africa, 20th-21st centuries. Identity processes and political re-mobilization Convenors : Camille Evrard, Martin Mourre, Romain Tiquet Abstract This panel would like to draw attention to the emergence of veterans’ groups in Africa. From a historical point of view, several studies have recently focused on the participation of African soldiers from the British and French empires in world wars and wars of decolonization. The notion emerging out of Political Science of post-conflict has led to a reconsideration of local arenas for the production of public policies. However, little attention has been devoted exclusively to veterans in Africa from both a historical medium-term conjuncture and a resolutely comparative perspective. Concentrating on identity formation defined through the shared experience of military violence allows us to ask a series of questions about the dynamics of contemporary Africa. Possible contributions could focus on biographical trajectories, whether related to war trauma, career paths in policing professions or as a spokesperson for […]

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