Tag Archives | security

US Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Tibor Nagy in Europe and West Africa

It took the Trump administration an unusually long time to appoint an Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs. When the nominee was ultimate chosen, it was Tibor Nagy, a retired Foreign Service officer who had served as ambassador to Guinea and Ethiopia. His swearing-in took place in September (see his remarks from that ceremony here). Nagy is now on his first trip overseas (I think) since taking his post. Lasting from 29 October to 10 November, the trip will take him to the United Kingdom, France, Togo (November 1), Guinea (November 2-4), Mali (November 4-7), and Nigeria (November 7-10). From the official statement, let’s just excerpt the part about Mali and Nigeria: In Bamako, Mali on November 4-7, Assistant Secretary Nagy will hold meetings with Malian government officials, host a trade and entrepreneurship roundtable, and meet with YALI alumni. The final stop on the trip will be Abuja, Nigeria. Assistant Secretary Nagy will have meetings with government officials, members of the American business community, religious leaders, civil society organizations, youth groups, and he will deliver a speech at Baze University on U.S.-Africa relations. I was not previously familiar with Baze University, which is located in Abuja. Its website is here. Nagy laid out […]

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« Contestations islamisées : le Sénégal, entre diplomatie d’influence et islam politique » Bakary Sambe

    Bakary Sambe: “Senegal is experiencing the geopolitical paradox of being, at one and the same time, the continuum and sub-Saharan depth of the Arab-Muslim world and a traditional strategic partner of the Western powers. Long penetrated by the ideological trends that fuel political Islam, it remains, for the time being, an “island of stability in an ocean of instability” at the heart of political and security developments in West Africa. In the Sahel where these same Western powers and those of the Arab-Persian Gulf are in search of unrestrained oases of influence. The Islamist political disputes and the old claims for the recognition of the “Arabophonie” of a country-symbol of the “Francophonie” are at the heart of this book exposing the socio-political vulnerabilities of Senegal, often hidden, facing an elite struggle with contradictory socialisations”. Bakary Sambe provides a detailed analysis of these burning issues in a context where the tense security situation, the rise of extremism and the dangers linked to transnational terrorism paradoxically impose on the “secular” states of the region and elsewhere management of the religious. Read More  

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